February122014
A number of Shirley Temple movies were adapted from famous books and short stories. My favorite, both movie and book, is “The Little Princess,” adapted from the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett.
The 1905 classic tells the story of Sara Crewe, a boarding school girl who goes from pampered princess to penniless servant. Shirley Temple plays her as a sweet girl, but also one who is stubborn, temperamental and has a strong sense of justice. Oh, and she can sing and dance. ;) Not in the original tale, obviously, but it does add to the movie’s charm.

A number of Shirley Temple movies were adapted from famous books and short stories. My favorite, both movie and book, is “The Little Princess,” adapted from the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett.

The 1905 classic tells the story of Sara Crewe, a boarding school girl who goes from pampered princess to penniless servant. Shirley Temple plays her as a sweet girl, but also one who is stubborn, temperamental and has a strong sense of justice. Oh, and she can sing and dance. ;) Not in the original tale, obviously, but it does add to the movie’s charm.

February32014
October192013
I was inspired to create this gif after reading "Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming" by Neil Gaiman, and seeing images of an abandoned Detroit library. When I was a kid, I rode my bike every Saturday to the local library, which was less than a mile from my home. Where I live now, a child would have to ride her bike 10 miles to the nearest library. Even by car, it takes a dedicated parent and engaged child to make the trip. All the more reason adults, whether they have children or not, need to show enthusiasm and support for public libraries.

I was inspired to create this gif after reading "Why our future depends on libraries, reading and daydreaming" by Neil Gaiman, and seeing images of an abandoned Detroit library.

When I was a kid, I rode my bike every Saturday to the local library, which was less than a mile from my home. Where I live now, a child would have to ride her bike 10 miles to the nearest library. Even by car, it takes a dedicated parent and engaged child to make the trip. All the more reason adults, whether they have children or not, need to show enthusiasm and support for public libraries.

October72013
With NaNoWriMo less than a month away, I thought it time to post a warning about plot bunnies. Sure, they start out cute and intriguing, but they can lead you to a very dark place. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing…

With NaNoWriMo less than a month away, I thought it time to post a warning about plot bunnies. Sure, they start out cute and intriguing, but they can lead you to a very dark place. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing…

October22013
September242013
In honor of Banned Books Week, I have created this gif representing only a small portion of the banned books I’ve read and loved. Want to know more? Check out the Banned Books Week website.Looking for banned and challenged books to read? Check out these lists:
100 Most Frequently Challenged Books by Decade
Banned & Challenged Classics
Banned Books That Shaped America

In honor of Banned Books Week, I have created this gif representing only a small portion of the banned books I’ve read and loved.

Want to know more? Check out the Banned Books Week website.

Looking for banned and challenged books to read? Check out these lists:

100 Most Frequently Challenged Books by Decade

Banned & Challenged Classics

Banned Books That Shaped America

September12013
This quote by Anton Chekhov isn’t just referring to show-don’t-tell. He could have easily said, “the glint of light on a pool of water” or “the glint of light on a dark window,” but these don’t evoke the same response.Broken glass suggests action, rising tension and potential conflict. The crunch of glass beneath a character’s feet should make us cringe along with the character. I thought of this quote when I saw the Season Six opener for “Supernatural.” In this case, the broken glass could refer to a broken world with heaven and hell asunder, or to Sam’s brokenness as he grapples with his soul. In any case, the ethereal light shining off the shards shows us we’re about to embark on a dark tale.

This quote by Anton Chekhov isn’t just referring to show-don’t-tell. He could have easily said, “the glint of light on a pool of water” or “the glint of light on a dark window,” but these don’t evoke the same response.

Broken glass suggests action, rising tension and potential conflict. The crunch of glass beneath a character’s feet should make us cringe along with the character.

I thought of this quote when I saw the Season Six opener for “Supernatural.” In this case, the broken glass could refer to a broken world with heaven and hell asunder, or to Sam’s brokenness as he grapples with his soul. In any case, the ethereal light shining off the shards shows us we’re about to embark on a dark tale.

August252013
Neil Gaiman is a bestselling, multi-published author in a variety of media, and yet here he gushes like a fanboy over Doctor Who. Gotta love that.I also love what a great single paragraph, mini-synopsis this is. One of the hardest things we are asked as writers is to briefly describe our stories. Perhaps we should put on our fan hats and trying writing a synopsis that is both descriptive and entertaining.

Neil Gaiman is a bestselling, multi-published author in a variety of media, and yet here he gushes like a fanboy over Doctor Who. Gotta love that.

I also love what a great single paragraph, mini-synopsis this is. One of the hardest things we are asked as writers is to briefly describe our stories. Perhaps we should put on our fan hats and trying writing a synopsis that is both descriptive and entertaining.

August202013
August162013
Last night I went to see “The Rocky Horror Show” live on stage at City Lights Theater in San Jose, which put  me in the mood to create a Dr. Frank N. Furter gif. This being a literary kind of blog, I added a quote from the show’s creator, Richard O’Brien.Along with writing the stage play and co-writing the screenplay, Richard O’Brien is most famous for having played Dr. Frank N. Furter’s treacherous handyman, Riff Raff. In a candid interview with Dominic Wells of The Times, O’Brien discusses the creation of Dr. Frank N. Furter."He’s a drama queen, really," O’Brien says of Frank. "He’s a hedonistic, self-indulgent voluptuary, and that’s his downfall. He’s an ego-driven … um …" and here his voice lowers to a stage whisper, "I was going to say, a bit like my mother.”Blink-blink. Who knew? And yet isn’t that the point? As writers, we create characters from bits and pieces of what we know. But you don’t want your seventh grade English teacher to know that the crazed hatchet murderer in your novel is based on him. Maybe all you’re really borrowing is the teacher’s coffee breath, bad complexion and inner rage.
Richard O’Brien borrowed certain of his mother’s attributes and created a flamboyant, murderous and yet free spirited and poignant character that is still memorable today. You can read the interview here.

Last night I went to see “The Rocky Horror Show” live on stage at City Lights Theater in San Jose, which put  me in the mood to create a Dr. Frank N. Furter gif. This being a literary kind of blog, I added a quote from the show’s creator, Richard O’Brien.

Along with writing the stage play and co-writing the screenplay, Richard O’Brien is most famous for having played Dr. Frank N. Furter’s treacherous handyman, Riff Raff. In a candid interview with Dominic Wells of The Times, O’Brien discusses the creation of Dr. Frank N. Furter.

"He’s a drama queen, really," O’Brien says of Frank. "He’s a hedonistic, self-indulgent voluptuary, and that’s his downfall. He’s an ego-driven … um …" and here his voice lowers to a stage whisper, "I was going to say, a bit like my mother.

Blink-blink. Who knew? And yet isn’t that the point? As writers, we create characters from bits and pieces of what we know. But you don’t want your seventh grade English teacher to know that the crazed hatchet murderer in your novel is based on him. Maybe all you’re really borrowing is the teacher’s coffee breath, bad complexion and inner rage.

Richard O’Brien borrowed certain of his mother’s attributes and created a flamboyant, murderous and yet free spirited and poignant character that is still memorable today. You can read the interview here.

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